HOW TO DO AN ADVANCED SEARCH.

Mon Jul 08, 2013 3:56 pm by Admin


For the benefit of 944Hybrids users there are two search functions available for you to use.
The purpose of this sticky is to explain the "Advanced Search" function because it is much more powerful and is the best choice when researching information.

When you log on to the site a list of options is shown in a line at the top of the page. One option is labelled "Search", use this option (NOT the search box lower down on the right).

After you click on the upper search option, a drop down box appears. At the bottom of this box is a radio button marked "Advanced …

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Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap

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Re: Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap

Post  Raymond-P on Sun Sep 07, 2014 9:46 pm

Hey Thanks!! From your image tag I see you have traveled this road already with the exact same car.  I'm sure I can learn much from you!!

The thread I've been posting is behind my actual work just a bit as the engine in done and "lurking" in my garage on engine feet.
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One more post on the TCP pan installation and then a re-post of my adventures with the SPEC flywheel, clutch, and pressure plate package, and that's it for the engine build.  

I am preparing the car now to do the swap but it has not run for like 6 years.  I wanted to video the 2.5 16V engine running to support my sale efforts, but no luck starting it.  (It needs a water pump...that's what grounded her.) Replaced the battery and fuel relay....nothing.  The pump is simply not energizing.  I'm in the process of changing the pump and fuel filter.

Below is the challenge at hand...no pun intended!Laughing  Fuel was clear on the engine side of the pump.
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What a mess...cleaning this gunk out of the tank is my next sub-project.


Last edited by Raymond-P on Sun Sep 07, 2014 10:39 pm; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : Thought I should add a pic of)
Raymond-P
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Re: Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap

Post  Rich L. on Tue Sep 09, 2014 12:58 pm

Ick! You got some stank in the tank.

Your engine build looks great. Perhaps you already know, but I suggest some heat shielding on the driver's side while the engine is out. I used a product from DEI.

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Re: Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap

Post  rascalray on Tue May 17, 2016 7:13 am

Great work!

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Porsche Project Restart...

Post  Raymond-P on Mon Jan 28, 2019 12:46 am

To all of you that were following my build/swap thread, I offer my apology for falling off the face of the earth for over 4 years.  Life really took hold and my Porsche project just had to wait.  The dust has settled and now I'm targeting a spring 2019 test drive.  The LS-1 engine is complete but I still plan to post the last few steps of the build, namely installation of the oil pan, flywheel, clutch, pressure plate, throw-out bearing, and bell housing. There are quite a few important details that must be addressed on the back side of the engine.  I've made some significant progress in the "garage space" area this year that will facilitate the engine swap and I'm excited to get that started in the coming weeks.  Stay tuned...
Raymond-P
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Re: Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap

Post  sharkey on Mon Jan 28, 2019 1:52 pm

dont worry, it seems to happen to everyone.

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Re: Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap

Post  Raymond-P on Sat Feb 09, 2019 6:52 pm

sharkey...Just finished checking out your swap pics.  Very impressive, you have a lot of skills!  400 hp is GREAT!  When I get there I want to get more scoop on how you handled the replacement brake master cylinder.  
Also I see you rebuilt your transaxle.  I picked up an '86 16R 5P Turbo transaxle (non-LSD) with oil cooler to replace my 83D AGP.   It was advertised as being in good condition with about 90K miles.  A rebuild may be prudent but I'm anxious to get this car running and back on the road!
If you have any narrative that goes with your photo album, I'm interested.
Raymond-P
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Oil Pan

Post  Raymond-P on Sat Feb 09, 2019 11:12 pm

This is the first installment of my “catch-up” postings and I’m pretty much going from memory and notes from a shared photo album.
TCP returned my Pan and Pick-up tube in short order.  It was evident that the pan had been modified to clear the pick-up tube.  With the front and back cover on and the pick-up tube installed, I did a quick leak test on the pan using water and then cleaned it all up in preparation for installation.  This included a light coat of motor oil on any bare steel.  Below are pics of the inside and outside of the TPC modified Milodon Racing Pan.

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The next step is important in any engine build and vital if you have a stroker and/or modified the windage tray.  You must check the clearance between he pick-up tube screen and the bottom of the pan. GM specifications on this dimension is 1/4”– 3/8” in order to permit proper oil intake volume.  To check this, I set a piece of hi density foam that was about 7/16” thick on top of the pick-up and positioned the pan in place.  

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I was happy when the pan set flush with the block and did not contact the foam, even without the gasket.  Good to go!

The next check was to verify that the rear cover was no more than 0.020” above the oil pan mating surface of the block…. I used my pry bar as a straight edge.  The gap must be the same on both sides.

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Exactly 0.020…both sides.

Next, I filled the corner gaps with Permatex Blue just for insurance…While I was at it, I put a thin film on the entire unpainted mating surface of the oil pan just for some measure of corrosion protection.

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Next a new GM oil pan gasket GM#12612350 ($35) is set in place dry, followed by the oil pan.

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Pan bolts were tightened to 18 ft-lbs. each, including two temporary bolts where the TCP Oil Filter adapter will go… that’s next.[b][b][b][/b][/b][/b]


Last edited by Raymond-P on Sun Feb 17, 2019 12:04 am; edited 2 times in total (Reason for editing : Title Change)
Raymond-P
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Re: Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap

Post  sharkey on Sat Feb 09, 2019 11:37 pm

Raymond-P wrote:sharkey...Just finished checking out your swap pics.  Very impressive, you have a lot of skills!  400 hp is GREAT!  When I get there I want to get more scoop on how you handled the replacement brake master cylinder.  
Also I see you rebuilt your transaxle.  I picked up an '86 16R 5P Turbo transaxle (non-LSD) with oil cooler to replace my 83D AGP.   It was advertised as being in good condition with about 90K miles.  A rebuild may be prudent but I'm anxious to get this car running and back on the road!
If you have any narrative that goes with your photo album, I'm interested.  

ive got a few threads on here about various points in my build. in the "other conversions" section i have my main build thread, although many of those pics are now broken links. i have a thread in the brakes section about my my dual master cylinder setup, and a thread in the transmission section about rebuilding my AOR transaxle.

for your transaxle, rebuilding it may not be necessary, the main reason i went through mine was was just to have a look-see. i ended up powder coating the cases, added the case stiffening plate (something id recommend) and to swap 5th gear. i would say if your not experienced in manual transmissions and specifically transaxles, this isnt really something you want to learn on, they are quite complex and parts are expensive if you make a mistake. swapping 5th gear however is something thats simple enough to do on your own, and so is the case stiffening plate. your going to want to tackle the 5th gear swap before you put the trans in, you dont need to be buzzing a v8 down the highway at 2600 rpm at 60mph.

sharkey

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Re: Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap

Post  Raymond-P on Wed Feb 13, 2019 10:31 pm

Thanks sharkey! I will definitely be checking out your threads. Your tips on the 5th gear upgrade and case stiffening plate were exactly the encouragement I needed. I wasn't sure what I might be getting into but it sounds like I can do it without any exotic tools. My transaxle is currently on my engine stand waiting to be cleaned up as needed.
Raymond-P
Raymond-P

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TCP Oil Filter Adapter

Post  Raymond-P on Sun Feb 17, 2019 12:55 am

Before I could actually finish installing the oil pan, I had to complete installation of the TCP oil filter adapter and address the rear pan bolt needs. Below is the TCP oil filter adapter, shown with two new mounting bolts & washers, new O-rings, 2 stock M8 pan bolts, and 2 "custom" M8 head bolts.

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The thick mounting flange of the TCP oil filter adapter requires longer pan bolts that stock.  The quick fix was to cut down 2 of my unused stock M8 head bolts to the required 35 mm UHL.

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Left to right, stock pan bolt, stock M8 head bolt, M8 head bolt cut to 35 mm UHL

I used blue Loctite for the mounting bolts and some Lucas lube for the O-rings.  The mounting holes in the pan flange required some reaming to get all 4 bolts installed.  Not a big deal...just be sure to capture all those metal shavings!

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Lastly, the 2 M6 long bolts for the back of the stock LS1 pan cannot be used for the TPC pan.  I purchased some new M6 1.0 x 25mm units to do the job.

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Elected to use a “break-in” STP Oil filter S10060.  Suggested service units include: LS 1001, WIX# 57060, and Fram# PH10060.

Last step here was to bolt on the factory oil filter adapter cover with some shiny new bolts.  I didn’t torque this cover down yet as I’m still debating the need for an oil temperature sending unit.  If I go for it, I will need to tap the cover for a sending unit.  As an option, I could purchase the C5 cover (Part # 12551587 for $31) which is already tapped with a M12x1.5mm thread for the C5 Temperature Sending Unit (Part #12608814 for $24).

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Next up, a recap of the Flywheel, Pressure Plate, and Clutch Set-up….  These will likely be links to my previous posts elsewhere on this forum.
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TCP Pilot Bearing Adapter & Flywheel

Post  Raymond-P on Sun Feb 17, 2019 7:37 pm

Well folks, as I went through my previous posts from yesteryear, I realized that some were incomplete. For example, I left off most of the flywheel, clutch, and pressure plate installation procedures because of technical issues with the TCP pilot bearing adapter and specifications for the throw-out bearing.
So, to capture the build process sequentially without all the cross-referencing I’m going to update my old posts here in this thread and add some of the missing moments.  If you want to go back and see the original 2014 post and dialog with other forum members, below is the 1st link:

Anti Seize on LS1 Pilot Bearing Adapter?
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So here is my rewrite on the pilot bearing adapter and flywheel.  
The factory issue pilot bearing (GM - PC381 CP06), in my LS1 manual crank, was undamaged but gets replaced with the TCP Pilot Bearing Adapter to fit up the Porsche torque tube drive shaft.

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The first order of business was pulling the old bearing.  I borrowed a pilot bearing puller from my local Advance auto parts store ($38 deposit) but it just didn’t work.  Seems it was designed for solid bushing type bearing units.  Next, I tried a hammer type puller from AutoZone ($160 deposit- ouch!).  Both are shown below.

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Removal is not supposed to be difficult but mine turned out to be a stubborn beast… especially considering you must be careful about hammer blows to the LS1 crank to not damage the main bearing seals.  To get it done, I used the pipe and washers from my homemade harmonic balancer installation tool to take all the play out of the hammer tool.  Several light blows with the slide hammer then tighten the nut…rinse and repeat until it’s out.  It was slow going until I drilled a couple stress relief holes in the old bearing…seemed to help.

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After some general cleanup, I opted to install the flywheel before the pilot bearing adapter.  The unit provided by TPC is the SPEC steel flywheel SC75S, and I purchased ARP #070-330-2802 Pro Series 190 ksi Flywheel bolts, M11 x 1.50” (UHL 0.880”) at a cost of $33.10.

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Important installation Check List items include:
1. Cleanup of the 11mm threaded holes in the crank flange to ensure proper torque…Check!
(They really needed it!)
2. Be sure flywheel bolt holes are chamfered to properly accept the ARP bolts…Check!
3. Apply ARP flange lube and blue Loctite (242) on the bolt threads…Check!
4. Follow ARP installation instructions, torquing bolts to 85 Ft-lbs….Check!

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Since I’m kind of a one-man show, I needed some assistance to hold the crank from turning while torquing the flywheel bolts.  Some bar stock and a few scrap bolts in the pressure plate mounting holes did the trick.  I followed the ARP instructions using two passes to 85 ft-lbs.  

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Now that the flywheel is on, installing the new TCP pilot bearing adapter is next. Below is the replacement TCP pilot bearing adapter Part# 6202RSD S ’75, Front & Back (engine side):

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To make a long story short, the TCP pilot bearing adapter should be machined to what is called an “interference” fit so that it’s OD is just about 0.001” bigger that the crank bore hole ID.  This is all that is needed to prevent it from coming out on its own.  Unfortunately, mine was not and I could put it in and remove it without tools.  Not acceptable so I elected to have the adapter knurled which a friend of mine did on his lathe.

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I followed the advice once again of the forum experts, and used Loctite 609 retaining compound for insurance ($18 at Fastenal – ouch!).  This adds pull-out resistance for gaps up to 0.005” and still allows mechanical removal without heat. I cleaned both contact surfaces with Brakleen and then applied the compound to both surfaces as directed. Perfect fit with a few light hammer taps.

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With the pilot bearing adapter in place, I wanted to check the clutch plate clearance so I first measured the gap between the adapter and the flywheel.  Using my feeler gauges, I measured 0.080”.  Now on the flywheel side of the SPEC clutch plate, the hub is flush with a slightly raised surface of the plate as required.  See pics below:

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Clearance from the hub face to the face of the clutch material (1/8” thick on each side) measured 0.097”.   Therefore, the total clearance (or gap) between the clutch plate hub and the pilot bearing adapter is 0.080” plus 0.097” or 0.177”.  This confirms that the hub won’t ever touch the adapter even if the entire 1/8” (0.125”) of clutch material was completely gone.  Good to go!

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I placed a skin coat of Permatex anti-seize in the pilot bearing adapter before starting the clutch and pressure plate install.  That’s next…
Raymond-P
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Re: Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap

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