944Hybrids: 924/944/968 and 928 V8 Conversions
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HOW TO DO AN ADVANCED SEARCH.

Mon Jul 08, 2013 3:56 pm by Admin


For the benefit of 944Hybrids users there are two search functions available for you to use.
The purpose of this sticky is to explain the "Advanced Search" function because it is much more powerful and is the best choice when researching information.

When you log on to the site a list of options is shown in a line at the top of the page. One option is labelled "Search", use this option (NOT the search box lower down on the right).

After you click on the upper search option, a drop down box appears. At the bottom of this box is a radio button marked "Advanced …

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» Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap
Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap - Page 7 EmptyWed Oct 20, 2021 1:39 am by Raymond-P

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Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap

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Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap - Page 7 Empty Re: Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap

Post  Rich L. Thu Sep 16, 2021 11:03 am

nphd2000 wrote:Sure I'll be asking more questions and I'll try to post in appropriate areas...this seemed to be the only active thread.

Welcome to the forum and best on your project. I did my swap a few years ago but still follow builds and help if I can. Agreed there's not a lot of activity here right now. As Ray suggested, do create your own build thread and it'll become a 2nd active thread. Very Happy

My thread is up there, "Rich's LS Powered..." but I haven't added to it in ages. I used a C5 manual, a.k.a. "2 piece", bell housing. Back then they were a dime a dozen...

Rich
Rich L.
Rich L.

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Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap - Page 7 Empty Front Sway Bar Installation

Post  Raymond-P Mon Oct 18, 2021 7:42 pm

Greetings all, we just got back from SoCal about a week ago and I’m getting back on track.

First a few updates:

Radiator Fitment:
In September I was anguishing over fitment of my Griffin Racing Radiator, specifically the proper LS1 thermostat housing, compatible radiator hoses, sensor fittings, radiator mount modifications, and cooling fan shroud adaptation. This all ended abruptly when I decided to follow forum expert advice and purchase the Texas Performance Concepts (TPC) LSX conversion radiator package.

I don’t believe this radiator package is fully described yet on the TPC web page so you will need to contact Kent for details and to place an order.  However, from my conversation with Kent, I can share with you that the radiator is an all-aluminum custom made, dual-pass, unit that has all the fittings welded in optimum locations for an LSX/944 transplant and includes custom mounting hardware and correct hoses.  Kent has also designed a new custom laser cut aluminum shroud that adapts factory turbo dual cooling fans to the custom radiator.  The fan shroud is key to proper air flow through the radiator at low speeds.

Currently, I’m waiting for delivery which is estimated to be another 7-14 days depending on the shroud fabrication & delivery timeline.  I’ll post an update when the goods arrive along with documentation of my installation experience.

Steering Shaft Linkage “Clunking Sound”
With some help from my neighbor (proud owner of a ’66 Chevelle SS), we tried to track down the source of this mysterious sound.  The steering shaft linkage and all other moving parts are NOT contacting anything on the body or frame.  There is NO discernable play in the u-joints. The sound is only produced in one specific position of the linkage and is there is no mechanical resistance felt that correlates with the sound.

Our conclusion was that the sound being generated is coming from the upper steering shaft u-joint, and that perhaps is has a defective bearing.  I never noticed any sounds during the driving years, or pre-deconstruction, or even during rehab of the steering shaft.  Therefore, I’m taking the “wait and see” approach and moving forward.

Front Sway Bar Installation

After removing the front sway bar, which seems like ages ago, a quick overview revealed that a leaking PS fluid reservoir was continually “bathing” the bushing on passenger side drop link mount, and it was swollen and decomposed.  In the pic below, you can see what the new bushings look like (right side pair) compared to old units.  The damaged passenger side bushing is second from left.

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<Old and new 25.5 mm sway bar bushings>

BTW… before purchasing new bushings, I measured my sway bar diameter to determine the correct bushing size.  I was pleased to find that I have the optional 25.5mm unit vs. the standard 23 mm unit.  YAY!!  Very Happy    This was also confirmed by the Porsche PN on the drop link mount and clamp, both ending with “01.”

I ordered a pair of new stock replacement bushings from 944OnLine for $33 plus tax and shipping.

As usual, I rehabbed the sway bar, drop link mounts, and all the connection components before reinstallation.  A fresh coat of paint makes all things “like new!”

…Except the bushings that is.  Sway bar end bushings and the control arm grommets were all in good shape and I suspect they were replaced at one time.

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<Rehabbed Sway Bar Hardware & New Bushing>   <Drop Link Clamp Porsche Part Number>

The install was straightforward.  It always helps to have plenty of BEFORE pictures to make sure everything goes back together properly.
• First, I coated the inside of each sway bar bushing clamp with Syl Glide and inserted the new bushings.
• Then I placed each clamp in my bench vise (with soft jaws) and closed the clamps far enough to install the clamp bolts through the drop link mounting brackets.
• After removing the clamps from the vise, I tightened the clamp bolts and M8 lock nuts with a 13mm socket and 13mm wrench until they were snug.
(I used zinc plated flat washers on each side to preserve my paint job!)
• Next, I lubed the ends of the sway bar with Syl Glide so I could easily slide the mounting brackets with new bushings into their proper location.
• I could then fully tighten the M8 lock nuts to 17 ft-lbs.
• Finally, I slid the sway bar control arm link mounts over the ends of the sway bar.  

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<Front Sway Bar Before and After Reconditioning>

With the sway bar fully reassembled, the next step was to clean up the frame rails where the drop link mounts connect.  I believe this area was the last remnant of oil and grime from all the old factory PS reservoir leaks.  After a good cleaning with degreaser, surface prep with CRC Brakleen, and a coat of Rust-Oleum “Cherry Red,” the mounting area looked pretty good!

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<Drop Link Mounting Area Before and After>

To install the sway bar, the end drop links must first be connected to the lower control arms.  Use a stool to support one end while connecting the opposite end.   I coated each rubber grommet with Syl Glide, sandwiched the control arm between the link grommets and (after both ends were connected) tightened each M10 mounting nut to 18 ft-lbs. with a 17mm socket.  The mounting nuts are supposed to be locking nuts but mine were NOT, so I added lock washers.  When installing the remaining side, you will likely need to jack up the lower control arm to make the connection.

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<Lower Control Arm Sway Bar Drop Link>                         <Sway Bar Installation Jack Set-up>

Once the sway bar end links were connected to the lower control arms, I used my floor jack and a board to evenly raise the sway bar until the drop link mounting brackets could be simultaneously bolted to the frame rails.
 
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<Drop Link Mount Position Before Jacking>        <Drop Link Mount After Jacking w/Bolts Installed>

Note:  Upon examination of the M8-1.25 x22 drop link mounting bolts, I noticed significant bolt wear on two of them just below the head.  Clearly, they had come loose!  What a Face

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<Damaged Drop Link Mounting Bolt>

To prevent this from reoccurring, the replacement bolts were installed with blue Loctite and lock washers.  Each was tightened to 17 ft-lbs. with a 13mm socket and 8” long 3/8” drive extension, after they were hand-started and the mounting brackets were both snug against the frame.

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<Completed Front Sway Bar Installation>

With the front sway bar installed, the next step is to complete the Hydro boost installation.

That will be next…
Raymond-P
Raymond-P

Posts : 174
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Age : 66
Location : Beaver, PA

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Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap - Page 7 Empty Re: Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap

Post  Plucky948 Mon Oct 18, 2021 8:11 pm

Good job on the sway bar refresh. I currently run the tpc radiator with a single fan, I think it's 14", maybe 16" I forget. It works good but thinking of wrapping a shroud around it and a front air deflector angled downwards to direct air to top of rad. The Temp range after an hour driving are 189F cruising to 205F in stop and go 80F ambient outside temperature. I have problems over 92F its just an oven. What really helped was the painless 70amp relay. The 30/40amp relay on a bigger spal performance fan did not do well. The tpc fan fits like a glove and I had the spal brackets welded to it for lowest profile on room. Not sure of the difference between lindsey racing fan, wizard cooling or tpc quality wise but either will fit and the most tubes is the one to get I guess. Your build is looking really good so keep up the good work.

Dave


Last edited by Plucky948 on Mon Oct 18, 2021 8:13 pm; edited 1 time in total
Plucky948
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Join date : 2017-06-21
Location : Southern NJ

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Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap - Page 7 Empty sway bar spacers

Post  nphd2000 Mon Oct 18, 2021 8:13 pm

Quick question. I noticed you are utilizing crossmember drop spacers but none on the sway bar. Are they not necessary? I would assume you would want to drop the mounting points of the crossmember, control arm, and sway bar brackets all the same distance. TIA

nphd2000

Posts : 11
Join date : 2018-04-05

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Post  Raymond-P Mon Oct 18, 2021 9:42 pm

nphd2000,

Excellent observation.  Your assessment is correct in that the the control arms are now mounted lower than stock by 1/2 inch while the drop link mounts remain in their original position.

The thing is, when both control arms move the same amount in the same direction (up or down), the sway bar simply rotates within the drop link bushings to accommodate the change.  Hence, sway bars don't affect ride height.

On the other hand, what they are designed to do is resist "differential" vertical movement in the front suspension by virtue of torque resistance in the sway bar shaft.  This provides additional stiffness in the individual wheel suspension and reduces roll when going through a turn.  This explains why a bigger diameter sway bar provides for "flatter" cornering and improved tire contact.

So to answer your question... IMHO, mounting spacers for the sway bar drop link mounts are not necessary.
Raymond-P
Raymond-P

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Location : Beaver, PA

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Post  nphd2000 Tue Oct 19, 2021 8:00 am

I'll buy that logic. I guess if there is no contact between sway bar and control arm at full droop it shouldn't be an issue. I will start my sway bar restoration over the weekend....I have a bulging bushing on the passengers side as well! Over the winter I will tackle the brake rehab as you did as well. May be asking you a few questions about where you sourced the parts for re-build.TIA

I wish I had your work space BTW

nphd2000

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Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap - Page 7 Empty Hydro-Boost Install – Part 2: High Pressure Lines

Post  Raymond-P Wed Oct 20, 2021 1:39 am

This post is a follow-up to article “Hydro-Boost Install – Part 1” that I posted July 8, 2021.

As a reminder, below is a pic of the TPC Hydro-boost (HB) kit. (Sans the TPC transaxle support plate!)

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<TPC Hydro-Boost Kit>

In Part 1 the HB unit was installed.  Now that the engine, front suspension, and power steering rack is in place, the next step was to prepare and install the high- and low-pressure hoses connecting the HB to the PS rack and PS pump.

The TPC kit includes the following connection components:

1 – HB adapter block with 2 -AN 6 fittings and one 5/8” hose end barb already mounted
4 - reusable steel high-pressure connectors for 5/8” hose.
• 2-90 deg. units for HB connection of high-pressure line in from the GM PS pump, and the high-pressure line out to the PS rack gear box.
• 1-90 deg. unit for the GM PS pump connection of the high-pressure line out to the HB
• 1-45 deg. unit for the PS rack gear box connection of the high-pressure line in from the HB

1 - reusable composite low-pressure connector for 5/8” hose.
• 1-45 deg. unit for the PS rack gear box connection of the low-pressure return line out to the GM PS reservoir
1 - brass T for a 5/8” hose connection to the GM PS pump reservoir return line from HB low-pressure line.
4 - SS screw type hose clamps
1 – AN 6 fitting for the GM PS pump high-pressure outlet
2 – AN 6 12mm fittings to replace the PS rack high- and low-pressure banjo-bolt fittings
9.0 ft of 5/16” ID steel braided, high-pressure hose line
7.7 ft of 5/16” ID fiber reinforced rubber, low-pressure hose line

For this “Part 2” installment, I was able to build both high-pressure lines and get them installed.  

Here’s how I did it:

I decided to build the line from the PS pump to the HB first, and began by installing one of the 90 deg. reusable connectors to the end of the supplied high-pressure line.  I had never used these before and I imagine many readers may not have as well, so I carefully documented the process.  If you’re unfamiliar with their construction, they consist of two pieces…a hexagonal exterior fitting that threads onto the outside of the hose with left hand threads, and an AN connection end that has a tapered end that fits inside the hose.  The two pieces thread together using a very fine right-hand thread and form a high-pressure connection.
.
Step 1:  Mark the full insertion depth.  I used blue painter’s tape.

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<Insertion Depth for Full Clamping Effect>                    <Internal Hose Cutting Debris>

Step 2: Clean the cutting debris from the hose.  I used compressed air and then some Brakleen on a paper towel to clean out the end 2-3 inches.  We don’t want any rubber shavings or wire remnants in our PS fluid!
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<Completed Fitting Installation>                        <Routing the High-Pressure Line to the HB>

Step 3: Connect the completed fitting to the PS pump and route the loose end of the hose along the cylinder head adjacent the fuel injectors and under the coil pack harness.

Step 4: Mark the cut length and fitting orientation for the HB connection fitting.  I installed the 2nd 90 deg. fitting in the HB just tight enough for this purpose.  I marked the tape with a black line indicating the plane of the 90 deg. fitting.

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<Marking the Hose Length at the HB>                           <Marking Orientation Lines>

Step 5: Cut the hose to length.  I used a cutting wheel to get the job done, followed by some filing to remove any wild steel wires, and then I trimmed the fiber mesh wrapping with shop scissors to make a nice clean end.  When I was done with the outside, I cleaned out the inside with compressed air and swabbing as previously noted.  
NOTE:  The clean-up procedure is essential for every cut.

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<Hose Cutting with a Cut-off Wheel>                                      <Fully Prepared Hose End>

Step 6: Mark the full hose insertion depth and mark the hose alignment with the fitting.  It is important to get the alignment right for easy connection because high-pressure line has limited flexibility.

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< Insertion Depth for Full Clamping Effect >                   <Alignment of the Fitting and Hose>

Step 7:  Remove the piece of tape used to mark the cut line and thread on the exterior hose fitting.  After wrestling with two wrenches to assemble the first fitting, I resorted to using my bench vice for future assemblies making sure the alignment was correct when the AN end of the fitting was fully tightened. I also used just a touch of synthetic motor oil on the tapered shaft to facilitate tightening.

Step 8: Install the hose at both ends (loosely).  The final completed build used a hose length of 29 inches.

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<Completed Hose Connections for PS Pump to HB>

Step 9: Build the high-pressure line from the HB to the PS rack gear box (PSR).  To start, I installed the 3rd 90 deg. fitting on one end of the remaining length of HP hose.  Then I connected the fitting to the HB TPC adapter block and snugged up the connection.

Step 10: Route the free end of the HP hose along the length of the cylinder head parallel with the PSR to HB hose previously installed.

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<HB to PSR HP Hose Top Routing>                                    <HB to PSR HP Hose Front Routing>

Step 11:  At the front of the engine, fish the HP hose down beside the PS pump and then behind the alternator, under the engine mount upright, and between the PSR gear box and engine block.

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< HB to PSR HP Line Bottom Routing>                < HB to PSR Connection Cut Length and Alignment >

Step 12:  Install the 45 deg. connection fitting on the PSR HP port fitting (lower) facing up, and establish the desired cut length and hose orientation.  Use enough hose to go past the gear box and make a U-turn to achieve a good alignment.  There is ample clearance from the header but I will be installing heat wrap on the PSR hoses just for insurance.

Step 13:  Once the hose is marked, remove it, then install the 45 deg. connection fitting, and reinstall the completed hose for a final connection.  The final completed build used a hose length of 64 inches.

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<HB to PSR HP Line U-Turn>

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<Completed HP Hose Installation>

At this point, all the connections are just hand tight.  After I build the low-pressure line and all fits well, everything will be fully secured.

Next topic, building and installing the low-pressure lines.


Last edited by Raymond-P on Wed Oct 20, 2021 8:22 pm; edited 3 times in total (Reason for editing : Text edits)
Raymond-P
Raymond-P

Posts : 174
Join date : 2013-06-29
Age : 66
Location : Beaver, PA

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