944Hybrids: 924/944/968 and 928 V8 Conversions
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HOW TO DO AN ADVANCED SEARCH.

Mon Jul 08, 2013 1:56 pm by Admin


For the benefit of 944Hybrids users there are two search functions available for you to use.
The purpose of this sticky is to explain the "Advanced Search" function because it is much more powerful and is the best choice when researching information.

When you log on to the site a list of options is shown in a line at the top of the page. One option is labelled "Search", use this option (NOT the search box lower down on the right).

After you click on the upper search option, a drop down box appears. At the bottom of this box is a radio button marked "Advanced …

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Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap

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Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap - Page 6 Empty Steering Knuckle, Wheel Hub, and Disc Brake Rehab

Post  Raymond-P Wed Aug 25, 2021 11:09 pm

For now, the task at hand is to clean-up and restore the function of the factory units.   Suspension and brake upgrades will be future projects

The first task was to get the front brakes off.   Removing the caliper mounting bolts was more difficult than usual because about 1/4” of the bolt extends beyond the threaded hole in the steering knuckle and was completely rusted.  This caused some slow going and required a ratchet handle extension for more torque on the lower bolt and a few hammer blows on the upper bolt.  

I disconnected the ABS/wear indicator sensor and brake line extension to remove the caliper for rebuilding.  I purchased rebuild kits for both the front and rear brakes from 944 Online, along with new SS brake line leads and replacement disc mounting screws.  More on these items later….

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<944 OnLine - Stainless Steel Brake Line Kit & Disc Mounting Screws>

Next was removal of the rotor disc itself which should have been simple.  Normally removal of the two mounting screws followed by a gentle hammer tap does the trick and the disc comes right off.  Not for me!!!  I managed to strip one of the Philips head screws because I used the wrong bit and had to remove it with an easy-out.  These screws are cut for a PH3 bit and should be hand tight only as the wheel lug nuts are what truly secure the disc.  It took half a can of PB Blaster and about an hour of pounding with a small hammer to break loose to passenger side disc.  Turns out the cast aluminum hub had corroded badly from sitting so long and “pressure packed” the clearance gap between the wheel hub perimeter and the rotor disc.

I later learned that the rotor disc has two threaded holes about 6 mm in dia. or so, to install bolts that will push the disc off the hub.  I’m not sure that would have worked for me, but I’ll try it on the driver’s side.

Driver's Side Update:
This rotor was also seriously corroded on.  I tried hammering briefly and then used the threaded holes in the rotor to try and push the rotor off the hub.   NO LUCK!  The rotor actually fractured and I went back to using hammer blows.  I suppose using a bolt through the threaded holes works fine on rotors in good condition.  Otherwise, unless you're replacing the rotors, I would stick with penetrating fluid and hammer blows.


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<Fractured Rotor>

Once I got the rotor disc off, it was clear the hub needed reconditioned to remove a heavy crust of aluminum oxide.  However, before I started all that, I decided to install the control arm to stabilize the assembly.  I already media blasted and repainted them right after I took them off, so they were ready to go.  It’s so nice to work with clean parts!!  Very Happy

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                                         <Control Arms Before and After Reconditioning>

I loosely installed the factory M12-1.50 front cross-frame bushing bolt and locking nut for the passenger side control arm, placed the TPC 1/2” aluminum spacer on top of the control arm mounting bracket, and hand threaded the new M10-1.50 x 90mm chassis connection bolts provided in my TPC kit.

To my surprise, the TPC bolts were too long and ran out of threads before the control-arm could be pulled up tight.  In the pic below, you can see the factory bolt has about 65mm total shaft length but the last 5mm or so has self-tapping treads.  This is sufficient for proper engagement without the 1/2” spacer.  On the other hand, you can see that the 30mm of thread on the 90mm TPC bolt is not enough to allow any clamping force, even with the 5 mm heavy washer and 1/2" spacer.  

My local hardware store saved the day again with 4 new M10-1.50 x 70mm Class 8.8 bolts for only a $1.45 each.  These were just the right length to allow hand starting the bolts and still get the engagement and clamping force needed.  I tightened these bolts to 34 ft-lbs and the cross-member bushing bolt to 48 ft-lbs as per my Haynes Manual.  Lastly, I reinstalled the control arm ball joint into the steering knuckle and tightened the mounting bolt and deformed lock nut until “tight.”  The torque spec is 10-12 ft-lbs but there’s insufficient space to use my torque wrench… on either side.

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< Control Arm Mounting Bolts>                                            <Final Control Arm Frame Connection>

Control Arm UPDATE – 9/7/2021
Before installing the passenger side control arm, I checked both chassis bushings and the ball joint boot, and all appeared to be in good condition.  It was a slightly different story with the driver’s side.  Although the ball joint itself is tight and in good shape, the ball joint boot was split all the way around and required replacement.  Once again, I turned to Ian at 944OnLine to get the proper replacements boots.  
PORSCHE 944 TURBO 951 S2 968 BALL JOINT BOOT NEW
Item ID: 391745064621 - $14.95 Each plus tax & shipping.  $36.14 Total for me in PA.

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<Split ball joint boot>                                                      <Underside of Pressed-in Ball Joint>

With the control arm fully connected I began reconditioning the wheel hub and steering knuckle.

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                                     <Passenger Side Control Arm Installed>

I removed the dust cap with a hammer and small chisel, loosened the 6mm Allen head bold holding the threaded locking clamp on the steering knuckle spindle and removed the clamp, then pulled off the hub assembly and outer wheel bearing all together.  Next, using a 10mm socket and ratchet, I removed the 3 bolts holding on the splash guard.  The steering knuckle was then fully exposed for a good cleaning and a full repaint. This included using a tap to chase the threads for the caliper mounting bolts.

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<Threaded Locking Clamp >                                 <Bare Steering Knuckle Spindle and Splash guard>          
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<Steering Knuckle Reconditioned>                                                 <Wheel Hub Reconditioned>

Reconditioning of the wheel hub included media blasting, a full repaint, and a complete flush and repacking of both the front and rear wheel bearings.  I did not remove the rear wheel bearing from the hub for fear of damaging the rear seal.  After cleaning however, the dry bearing rollers and races all worked together smoothly.  I used Amsoil 100% synthetic wheel bearing grease to repack the bearings... and yes, it’s red.  The rear factory seal appears fine…. I just hope it works as good as it looks!

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<Splash guard mounted and Steering Knuckle Greased>                   <Front Wheel Bearing Set

I media blasted and repainted the splash guard too, and reinstalled the mounting bolts with new washers and Loctite, torqued to 7.5 ft-lbs.  After applying a light coat of grease on the spindle and inside of the wheel hub, I slid the wheel hub in place, inserted the front bearing, and installed the threaded locking clamp.  This clamp is to be tightened just enough that the bearing thrust washer can be moved slightly with a flat blade screw driver.  This takes several iterations of tightening and spinning the hub to obtain the correct grease film on contact surfaces.  When properly installed, the wheel hub should rotate smoothly with no bearing play.  Once achieved, the Allen head bolt should be tightened to 10-12 ft-lbs.  

Not having the correct tools to apply a measured torque, I used an ordinary Allen wrench and made it “wrist tight.”  Finally the dust cap was reinstalled with a rubber mallet.

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                                           <Reconditioned Passenger Side Wheel Mount>

My brake component rebuild order with 944 Online included 8 new rotor mounting screws (~$1 ea.), 2 for each rotor, which I installed with a PH3 Philips head bit and a touch of anti-seize.  My Haynes manual calls out only 3.7 ft-lbs of torque for these screws.  

The rotors are drilled and slotted, zinc plated units from C Brakes.  I purchased 4 new rotors and ceramic brake pads for $208 in June of 2015.

The new SS brake line connections I just received were $80 for a set of 4, and I was quite happy to see new rubber grommets already installed.

The last update I did before rebuilding the calipers was to clean up the brake ABS/wear indicator wiring and re-wrap the bundle in 3/8” split wire loom.  Ends were sealed with silicone self-stick tape.

Next up will be the caliper rebuild….


Last edited by Raymond-P on Tue Sep 07, 2021 5:22 pm; edited 2 times in total (Reason for editing : Update for removal of Driver's side rotor. Update for Driver's side defective ball joint boot.)
Raymond-P
Raymond-P

Posts : 170
Join date : 2013-06-29
Age : 65
Location : Beaver, PA

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Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap - Page 6 Empty Front Caliper Rebuild

Post  Raymond-P Tue Aug 31, 2021 9:29 pm

Originally, I thought my brakes were in pretty good shape.  I had replaced the front pads and rear rotors and pads a while back, and even painted the exposed caliper parts red.   The problem is, “a while back” was over 15 years ago!

Turns out, the front rotors were heavily rusted with a rather large edge lip and will be scrapped, but the pads were still about 70% so I’ll clean them up a bit and they’ll go in my old parts bid.  Maybe someone else can use them.

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<Front Right Brake Caliper – Before>                       <Caliper Floating Frame and Piston Housing>

Disassembly of the caliper was simple enough.  Below is the removal order I used:

1. Brake pad retaining pin spring lock.
2. Two (2) brake pad retaining pins.  This unloads the flat, brake pad cross-spring.
3. Brake pads.  The inner pad against the piston will slide out the top.  The outer pad must first be
    pulled away from the floating caliper frame to disengage the mounting tab.
4. Brake pad mounting frame.
    a. Dislodge the mounting frame from the caliper floating frame
    b. Remove the piston housing guide spring from the mounting frame
    c. Separate the mounting frame from the floating frame
5. Piston housing. I used a drift and small hammer, alternating blows on the piston housing flanges to
    remove the piston housing from the caliper floating frame.  Slow and even is important here,
    especially with corrosion.
6. Bleeder screw
7. Piston dust boot retainer clip and dust boot.
8. Piston
9. Piston seal

Be sure to take lots of “before” pictures for reference during reassembly.  You’ll be glad you did!

After disassembly was complete, everything got a full media blast, surface cleaning with CRC Brakleen, and several coats of VHT Red Caliper Paint (900 F).  Any surface that contacts brake fluid was masked off.

The old piston housing dust boot was shot but the piston surface and the housing walls were in good condition.  Even the old piston seal looked pretty good.  The only other existing problem was that both the bleeder screw and housing bleed port were rust packed and non-functional.  Easily fixed with some solvent and a paper clip.

Note:  Brakleen should NOT be used on rubber or plastic parts and you must keep it off your paint.

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<Piston Housing Media Blasted>                                   <Front Brake Caliper Piston Seal Kit ~$17>

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<Front Caliper Parts Ready for Rebuild>

Parts ID starting at the top left and proceeding clockwise:
         Piston Housing
         Brake Pad Mounting Frame
         Piston
         Caliper Floating Frame (with Brake Pads)
         Dust Boot Retainer Clop, Dust Boot, and Piston Seal
         Retaining Pin Spring Lock (Only one used per Caliper)
         Piston Housing Guide Spring
         Brake Pad Cross-Spring
         Retaining Pins

Rebuild of the caliper piston started with a light coat of DOT4 brake fluid on the piston bottom and outer walls.  This was followed by a similar light coat on the inner walls of the piston housing including the seal groove.  

The new piston seal was then thoroughly lubed with DOT4 and inserted in the piston housing seal groove.  Next, I pressed the lubed piston into the piston housing.  It was a very TIGHT fit with the piston seal which is a good sign, but steady even pressure did the trick… albeit slowly.    I pressed the piston most of the way in by hand (using my body weight), just short of the dust boot mounting ring on the piston.   Then I lubed the new dust boot thoroughly with Sil-Glyde and installed it on the piston dust boot groove.  I worked the outer lip of the dust boot down into the mounting ring on the piston housing. Lastly, I installed the new dust boot retaining ring.

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<Rebuilt Piston Housing>                                    <Rebuilt Piston Housing in Caliper Floating Frame>

In preparation for reinstalling the piston housing in the floating caliper frame, I used my bench vice to further press in the piston until the face was flush with the compressed outer ring of the dust boot.  This is required to provide space for two new brake pads.  Next, I thoroughly lubed the piston housing slots and caliper frame rails with Sil-Glyde, carefully lined everything up, and pushed the housing into place. Without the corrosion, this was easily done by hand.  If needed, use a drift and small hammer, alternately striking the housing flange adjacent the housing slots.

The next step is the reunion of the brake pad mounting frame and the caliper floating flame.  To do this, the mounting frame is partially inserted through the floating frame and then the piston housing guide spring is mounted in the frame.  I lubed the guide rails on the caliper floating frame and the mounting slots on the mounting frame and put the two pieces together.
(Some pics coming of what this looks like...when I do the driver's side.)

9/6/2021 UPDATE:
So here's the part that my Haynes Manual left out... installing the piston housing guide spring.  In the 1st pic the guide spring is mounted in the brake pad mounting frame... there are holes for this and must be done after the pad mounting frame is partially inserted through the caliper floating frame.  The spring exerts pressure on a flat pad milled into the piston housing.  I lubed this area with Syl-Glyde which allows for smooth assembly.  The second pic below is the fully inserted brake pad mounting frame.


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<Guide Spring Installation>                                                   <Completed Assembly>

The remaining work is assembly of the caliper/mounting frame with new brake pads and rehabbed brake hardware.  All contact surfaces of the hardware were lubed with Sil-Glyde.

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<Brake Pads with Disc Brake Quiet>                                                 <Brake Pad on Piston>

I spayed the back of the new brake pads with Permatex Disc Brake Quiet, let them sit for 10 minutes and installed the outer pad in the mounting frame, being careful to engage the guide tab on the floating frame (See blue circle in pic). The inside brake pad is placed over the piston and the assembly placed on the rotor.  If there is insufficient space to do this, something is wrong, namely the piston is not sufficiently compressed or the outer brake pad in not engaged in the guide tab.   Otherwise, the mounting frame bolts are installed “snug” with a 19 mm socket.  I replaced the mounting bolt wave washers with new lock washers.

At this stage, the mounting frame is canted due to pressure from the piston housing guide spring and this prevents the retaining pins from being inserted.  This is corrected using a large flat blade screw driver leveraged between the wheel hub and the outer brake pad.  It doesn’t take much force or movement, but it is necessary.

Once the brake pad mounting plate holes are in alignment with the mounting frame retaining pin holes, the upper retaining pin can be inserted.  This is followed by inserting the cross-spring under the upper retaining pin and then pressing it down so the lower retaining pin can be inserted.

Be sure the retaining pins engage the brake pads and are fully inserted in the frame, reconnect the wear sensor lead, and then install the spring lock.  Once the caliper is fully assembled, the rotor should rotate easily with only minor contact with the brake pads… if any.

I then tightened the caliper mounting bolts to 63 ft-lbs in accordance with my Haynes Manual.

Below is the final rebuilt caliper.  One down… three to go!! Very Happy

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<Rebuilt Right Front Caliper>


Last edited by Raymond-P on Mon Sep 06, 2021 2:11 pm; edited 2 times in total (Reason for editing : Text edit. Procedure and Photo update.)
Raymond-P
Raymond-P

Posts : 170
Join date : 2013-06-29
Age : 65
Location : Beaver, PA

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Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap - Page 6 Empty Power Steering Rack (Part 2)

Post  Raymond-P Tue Sep 07, 2021 8:25 pm

Having finished rebuilding the front brake calipers and repacking the front wheel bearings, it was time to address the clearance issues with the rack high pressure lines and the LS oil pan.   My options seemed limited to be 1) replace the lines with flexible high-pressure line and AN fittings, or 2) reconfigure the existing lines.                        

I opted to remove these lines and reconfigure them with a tubing bender to fit between the rack mounting bracket and the oil pan.  This time I painted them silver to help detect any leaks.

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<PS Rack High-Pressure Lines – Factory>            <PS Rack High Pressure Lines – Modified>

The process involved removing the four banjo bolts that connect the lines and carefully collecting the eight rubber O-rings.  Cooper crush washers were not used here.  Inspection revealed all contact surfaces were clean and smooth and the O-rings where flexible and unscathed.  After about 1000 trips back and forth to my bench vice, I finally achieved the line shapes I wanted without any preloaded stress on the connections.  I was especially careful to avoid bending and/or applying any undue stress on the line near the connection fitting.  These fittings seem to be a braised connection that I could not really tests for leaks at this time.  I’m keeping my fingers crossed!!  All banjo bolts were torqued “forearm” tight with a 19mm wrench.  For what it’s worth, I found a source later that identified 22 ft-lbs when using cooper crush washers.

I was on my own for the actual install and used my buddy’s transmission jack to raise the rack into position.  No interference with the oil pan…YAY!!!!!! Very Happy

The jack was essential and allowed me to start the mounting bolts by hand which is highly recommended to avoid cross-threading the aluminum cross-member.

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<Rack Installation Driver’s Side>                               <Rack Installation Passenger Side>

All the M8 mounting bolts were started by hand and wrist tightened with a ratchet for a relatively tight fit.  Then the bolts were individually removed, blue Loctite applied, and reinstalled to 17 ft-lbs of torque.

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                                                       <Installed Rack>

Note that the rack low-pressure plastic balance tube had to be replaced because the relocated high-pressure lines and fittings dictated a slightly longer length.  The solution was 1/4" fuel line that provided a perfect diameter match with the plastic rack connectors.  The final connection was the factory ground wire (brown) between the rack and the cross-frame.

Next up… clearance check between the block and the steering rack tower casting.
Raymond-P
Raymond-P

Posts : 170
Join date : 2013-06-29
Age : 65
Location : Beaver, PA

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Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap - Page 6 Empty Power Steering Rack (Part 3)

Post  Raymond-P Wed Sep 08, 2021 7:08 pm

Clearance check...

The steering rack tower is just barely accessible between the header primaries… some access is available from under the car and some from above.  I raised the MAXJAX and got out my wireless LED work light to take a good look. Below are pics of the clearance between the rack mount and the oil pan, and the rack tower and the LS-1 block.   There’s only about 3/16” clearance between the rack high-pressure line and the LS-1 block....I think I’m good to go.

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<Rack Mounting Bracket / Oil Pan Clearance>                      <Rack Tower / LS-1 Block Clearance>

Next, I considered installation of the steering shaft.  I debated pre-installing the shaft on the PS rack tower and threading it through the header primaries as part of the rack test-fitting… but elected not to.

My understanding is the steering shaft must be lengthened by 1/2” or so to account for the 1/2" swap spacers.

So, the plan was to test fit the steering shaft from the top down to see what length I needed, and/or if it might be long enough.  I got started by covering all the exposed threaded posts with my extra bleeder screw dust caps to protect the paint job on the shaft …AND my knuckles!!!  What a Face   I also removed the #2-cylinder spark plug boot to provide a hand hole access to the top of the rack tower.

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<Bleeder Screw Caps on Threaded Posts>

The u-joint connection to the steering gear shaft spines requires a precise line-up of the u-bolt clamping bolt with the flat machined into the steering gear shaft.  Unfortunately, due to limited space and visibility, a successful union was not happening.

I’m sure after multiple attempts I could eventually make the connection, but it will be much easier if I lower the rack enough to position the steering shaft between the header primaries and then make the connection out in the open where I could see what I was doing.

Before I do that for a test fit, I want to ask the forum experts who have completed this modification….

1) Has a factory steering shaft EVER been long enough in anyone’s build???
2) Is there is a tried and true steering shaft length that accommodates the 1/2” spacers???


Your input is much appreciated as always, and will likely save me at least one fitting cycle before I make a permanent connection.

Thank You!!
Raymond-P
Raymond-P

Posts : 170
Join date : 2013-06-29
Age : 65
Location : Beaver, PA

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Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap - Page 6 Empty Re: Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap

Post  sharkey Wed Sep 08, 2021 7:57 pm

im running 1/2" subframe spacers and a stock steering shaft.

sharkey

Posts : 672
Join date : 2014-11-21
Age : 37
Location : Abbotsford BC

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Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap - Page 6 Empty Re: Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap

Post  Raymond-P Wed Sep 08, 2021 10:17 pm

Sharkey...thanks so much for your input.  

I'm encouraged now that my 1st test fit may turn out to be the final installation! Very Happy
Raymond-P
Raymond-P

Posts : 170
Join date : 2013-06-29
Age : 65
Location : Beaver, PA

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Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap - Page 6 Empty Re: Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap

Post  Leva Thu Sep 09, 2021 4:28 am

Im running a stock steering shaft. Just used smaller diameter thru bolts in the u joints to accommodate the spacers. The u joints are no longer flush with the splined shaft ends, but works just fine.

Leva

Posts : 48
Join date : 2020-04-04

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Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap - Page 6 Empty Re: Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap

Post  Raymond-P Thu Sep 09, 2021 6:10 am

Thanks Leva...

I love having a "Plan B" in my back pocket. I should have an update tonight.
Raymond-P
Raymond-P

Posts : 170
Join date : 2013-06-29
Age : 65
Location : Beaver, PA

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Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap - Page 6 Empty Re: Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap

Post  Hotrodz of Dallas Thu Sep 09, 2021 8:32 am

Like the other 2 said. Stock shaft with smaller bolts works perfect.
Hotrodz of Dallas
Hotrodz of Dallas

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Join date : 2015-10-31
Age : 63
Location : Dallas-Ft. Worth

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Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap - Page 6 Empty Power Steering Rack (Part 4)

Post  Raymond-P Thu Sep 09, 2021 9:17 pm

With encouragement from Sharkey, Leva, and Hotrodz of Dallas, I forged ahead with installation of the factory steering shaft. (Input much appreciated!)

Recall that I planned to lower the PS rack, attach the steering shaft to the PS rack tower, and raise the assembly back into place.  That was a pipe dream because fishing the steering shaft UP through the header primaries is all but impossible.

Subsequently, I returned to the top-down approach:

1) Fish the steering shaft down through the header primaries resting the lower U-joint on the PS rack
    tower.  (I zip-tied the upper U-joint to the HB so it couldn’t get away!)
2) Center the lower U-joint clamp bolt slot within the flat on the rack tower gear shaft.

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3) Remove the clamp bolt completely and then manually start the lower U-joint onto the rack tower
    splines.
4) Progress the U-joint down the splines just until the clamp bolt can be inserted and spin on the  
     locking nut by hand until it stops. This maximizes the span of the steering shaft.
    (I had to use a light “persuader” to do this because of paint on the splines.)
5) Confirm the PS Rack is centered.  This is done by removing the plastic plug from the observation  
     port on the bottom and aligning the red dot in the center of the port by turning the steering shaft.
6) Being careful not to move the rack, mark the lower U-joint clamp in plain view with fingernail polish
    to index its position relevant to the rack center.

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7) Turn the steering wheel shaft until the flat on the shaft spline is centered with the steering shaft
    upper U-joint clamp bolt slot. (My steering wheel was removed so there was no concern about
    position.)
8 ) Loosen the M8 rack mounting bolts to permit proper alignment of the upper U-joint connection.
9) Once again, remove the clamp bolt completely to allow the U-joint to slide onto the splines.
10) Being careful not to rotate the steering shaft, manually start the U-joint on the steering wheel  
      shaft splines.
11) Alternately progress the U-joint on the splines and tighten the PS rack mounting bolts.
      (Again, I had to use my persuader to advance the upper U-joint because of paint.)

This is where the process was a bit touch and go.  With the PS rack loose, I was able to manually start the upper U-joint, but it was a good 1/2” or so from being on the shaft far enough to insert the clamp bolt.  After multiple cycles of driving the U-joint on, tightening the rack mounting bolts, and confirming free steering shaft rotation, the U-joint was on far enough to insert the factory clamp bolt.  SUCCESS!!!

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<Completed Steering Shaft Installation>

Unfortunately, I destroyed my perfect rehab paint job…. Sad

The last step was to tighten both U-joint clamp bolts.  The manual says 21 ft-lbs but no room for a torque wrench so I tightened them “arm” tight.  Since the nuts are deformed steel lock nuts and the spline shaft flats do not extend to the shaft ends, there is no way the U-joints can come off the splines.

If one of the clamp bolts ever comes loose, I’ll feel it in the steering at the onset.

In conclusion, the 1/2" frame spacers lower the PS rack but the arc of this change nets a very small increase in shaft length which is accommodated by the tolerances built into the upper and lower U-joints.

My new ball joint boots came today so tomorrow I’ll finish putting the front suspension back together and then get refocused on the HB high and low pressure lines.
That’s next….
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Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap - Page 6 Empty Control Arm Boot Replacement

Post  Raymond-P Sun Sep 12, 2021 1:04 pm

With the steering shaft installed, the next order of business was to button-up all the loose ends with the PS rack and the front suspension.

First, I finalized the PS rack mounting bolt installation.  As previously noted, this was just individual removal and reinstallation with blue Loctite, and then torqueing each bolt to 17 ft-lbs.

Then, I rotated the new PS rack bellows until alignment was good and installed the new SS pull clamps.  I never used this type of clamp before, so I documented my approach for others in the same boat.  If I missed something here, someone please provide correction…you won’t hurt my feelings.

They appear to work by pulling the strap tight with a pair of plyers, bending it back over the guide frame and locking it down with the side tabs.  I cut off the excess strap to finish the job although I did create some sharp edges.  Below are the steps:

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<Pull Strap Tight>                                                                                  <Bend Back to Lock>

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<Secure Clamps>                                                                                   <Cut Off Excess Strap>

Next up, the driver’s side (DS) and passenger side (PS) control arm ball joints still needed reconnected to the steering knuckles, but before I could do that, the old ball joint boots needed replacement.

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<Old Ball Joint Boot Components>                                                 <New Ball Joint Boot Kit>

The new boot components are Rennbay brand products purchased from 944Online for $14.95 each:
PN: RB118.6 Ball Joint Boot (>CR< label molded into the boot)
Parts Include:
rubber boot, silicone grease ring, steel top retainer ring (on the boot), and bottom retainer coil.

Installation was simple enough:
1) Remove the old boot components and thoroughly clean all surfaces.  Note: I did not flood the area with solvent to preserve the grease below the ball that I could not replace.

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<Old Ball Joint All Clean PS>                                                <Silicone Grease Ring Installed PS>

2) Install the silicone grease ring (flange up) sliding it down the shaft as far as it goes.  I believe this creates a grease pocket just above the ball where you need it.  I found no such silicone ring under my factory boots. Suspect
3) Pack the space created by the grease ring with new grease, working the ball shaft 360 degrees around maxing out the tilt angle to ensure coverage. I used Amsoil 100% synthetic wheel bearing grease.

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<Ball Joint Packed with Grease PS>                                                     <Final Installation DS>

4) Slide on the new rubber boot with the top retainer ring in place and work the bottom of the boot into the machined mounting groove of the control arm.  Start by holding the boot in the groove at one location and progress around the joint until it’s all in.
5) Install the bottom retainer coil.  This is a little tricky and care must be taken NOT to accidently puncture the boot.  Start by placing the coil over the boot, separating the coil slightly and holding one end in the boot groove.  The coil is then simultaneously “rolled” opened and placed in the boot groove progressing around the boot.

With the new ball joint boots in place, I installed the control arms on the steering knuckles pounding the ball joints into place with a rubber mallet until the M12 clamp bolts could be installed.  These bolts have deformed locking nuts and are supposed to be torqued to 10-12 ft-lbs.   This seemed light to me for a connection that’s not supposed to move, so I tightened mine until they were “tight,” about 20 ft-lbs.

Next, I installed the tie rod ends in the steering knuckles and tightened the new lock washers and nuts to 30 ft-lbs as per spec.  I used Permatex anti-seize on the shaft interface to facilitate future maintenance.

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<New Tie Rod Nut & Lock Washer>                                            <Tie Rod End Prep w/Anti-seize>

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<Completed Assembly>

Once everything was permanently connected, I worked the wheels back and forth manually a few times just to check for function and clearances.   As it turns out, I’m getting a very light “clunking” sound that seems to be coming from the steering shaft area, but I can’t quite tell from under the car.  Suspect It’s not enough to restrict movement in any way.   Once I get a helper, I’ll figure it out and post an update.

The last thing to do on the front suspension is reinstall the front sway bar.
That will be next…
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Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap - Page 6 Empty Radiator and Thermostat – Research Phase

Post  Raymond-P Sun Sep 12, 2021 9:46 pm

Obviously, this is NOT the front sway bar installation as noted in my last post. However, the radiator installation in not too far off and another thread on the forum about the correct lower radiator hose got me wondering.

I purchased a Griffin universal racing radiator back in February of 2014 based on a list of candidates provided in my Greg Sloan V8 conversion manual.  The PN is 1-26201-X and it has a 1.50-inch INLET on the top passenger side and a 1.75-inch OUTLET on the bottom driver’s side.  Today it goes for ~$187 through most speed shops. IE: Summit Racing
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<944S Rad vs. Griffin 26201-X>                                     <GM 2002 LS1 WS6 Water Pump Flow>

My first challenge was to confirm the water pump INLET and OUTLET for both the radiator and the heater core.   There is so much conflicting information floating around regarding LSX water pump flow that it took me a while to figure it out.  About the only thing I was sure of was the radiator INLET is always on the top and the OUTLET is always on the bottom…regardless if it’s a downflow or crossflow design.  

I’ve marked the coolant flow on my engine photo above.  Blue arrows indicate INLETS and red arrows indicate OUTLETS

Below are corroborating diagrams that spell this out quite clearly…and why. Both are readily available on the Internet.

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<GM LS1 Manual Reproduction>

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<LS1Tech.com Forum Schematic>

This exercise helped me understand the LS1 cooling system and how it’s different than traditional SBCs and other domestic engines…particularly the location of the thermostat on the INLET side of the water pump. Recall that I’m an old MOPAR guy!

Interestingly, I checked into the coolant flow of my 944S which is nearly the same as the 944T and found that the thermostat is also on the INLET side of the water pump!

With the flow direction established, I now know that I have a hose challenge with my Griffin radiator.
The Griffin INLET measures 1.50-inch OD while the LS1 water pump OUTLET is 1.25-inch OD.
The Griffin OULET measures 1.75-inch OD while the LS1 water pump INLET is 1.50-inch OD.

By observation, both the upper and lower coolant hoses will be ordinary Z-shapes.  The 26201 Griffin radiator INLET requires a relatively short coolant hose to the LS1 water pump OUTLET.  No problem. However, the radiator OUTLET requires the lower hose to cross from the driver’s side to the passenger side location of the LS1 water pump INLET.  This IS a problem because the factory water pump INLET and thermostat housing, which is integral with the thermostat, projects primarily to the right and requires and impossible U-turn in the hose.

Note: Griffin also makes a radiator with both the INLET and OUTLET on the passenger side, PN 1-25201-X. I’m not sure if anyone has used this radiator.

The solution for me is to replace the factory thermostat housing and integral thermostat with an aftermarket 90-degree straight housing unit (or an adjustable swivel unit) and the proper (separate) LS1 thermostat.
Here is a link to the Spectre product I have my eye on, ~$42 at JEGS:
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Note:  My understanding is that all LSX water pumps and thermostats are not the same.  Be sure to buy the correct units for your water pump.

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<Spectre LS1 Straight Housing & T-stat>                       <Spectre LS1 Swivel Housing & T-stat>

I’m interested in any Forum feedback on using a straight or swivel housing.

A unique aspect of the LS1 thermostat is that it regulates both the intake of radiator coolant flow AND heater core flow.  Note in the photo below, the separate chambers of the water pump for the INLET and OUTLET of the heater core.

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<2002 LS1 Factory Thermostat & Water Pump Chambers>

Lastly, there is still the problem of conflicting hose diameters.
                Upper coolant hose: 1.25 in. water pump to 1.50 in. Griffin radiator
                Lower coolant hose: 1.50 in water pump to 1.75 in. Griffin radiator

I suppose a couple hose reducers can make the hose transitions to the Griffin rad without consequence.
                Dayco Radiator Hose Reducer - 1-1/2" to 1-1/4"
                Advance Auto Parts, PN: 76925 ~$8.19

                Dayco Radiator Hose Reducer - 1-3/4' to 1-1/2"
                Advance Auto Parts, PN: 76950 ~$9.29

That's it on the radiator for now.  
Front Sway Bar and Hydro-boost install is next...
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Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap - Page 6 Empty Re: Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap

Post  Hotrodz of Dallas Mon Sep 13, 2021 6:43 am

I feel you would be better off selling that radiator and buying TPC's that is made specifically for the LS. It has both fittings on the same side. Also has provisions for the coolant tank fill hose and bleed hoses. Plus TPC radiator comes with a mount for the stock 944 fans to bolt up to the TPC radiator.

By the time you have the radiator cap flange cutoff and capped, and the other fittings welded on for the fill and bleed hoses, you will have just as much money in your griffin as you would buying one made for the car. Plus the TPC rad would only need two short radiator hoses which come with the TPC kit.
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Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap - Page 6 Empty Re: Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap

Post  Raymond-P Mon Sep 13, 2021 6:48 am

Thanks Bob, I like the sound of that!
Will the TPC rad and lower hose accommodate the factory pump inlet??
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Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap - Page 6 Empty Re: Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap

Post  Hotrodz of Dallas Mon Sep 13, 2021 7:01 am

Raymond-P wrote:Thanks Bob, I like the sound of that!
Will the TPC rad and lower hose accommodate the factory pump inlet??

Yes sir, it will
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Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap - Page 6 Empty Re: Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap

Post  pipeman3rd Mon Sep 13, 2021 1:15 pm

I have a Wizard radiator with the turbo fans already mounted that is available. PM me if you are interested.

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Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap - Page 6 Empty Re: Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap

Post  Raymond-P Tue Sep 14, 2021 11:48 am

pipeman3rd wrote:I have a Wizard radiator with the turbo fans already mounted that is available.  PM me if you are interested.

I sent you a PM but it seems to be stuck in my OUTBOX.
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Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap - Page 6 Empty Re: Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap

Post  pipeman3rd Tue Sep 14, 2021 12:26 pm

Received and replied.

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Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap - Page 6 Empty Active thread

Post  nphd2000 Wed Sep 15, 2021 12:16 pm

So...this seems to be the only active thread here..and you seem to know quite a bit about these swaps so I have a question. Just started my swap journey and am confused about the bell housing and adapters. Search is great but seems to be old info. I picked up a C5 auto bell housing...Do I need a quarter inch spacer between the block and bell housing then the adapter plate from bell housing to torque tube?

Thank you

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Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap - Page 6 Empty Re: Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap

Post  Hotrodz of Dallas Wed Sep 15, 2021 12:39 pm

nphd2000 wrote:So...this seems to be the only active thread here..and you seem to know quite a bit about these swaps so I have a question. Just started my swap journey and am confused about the bell housing and adapters. Search is great but seems to be old info. I picked up a C5 auto bell housing...Do I need a quarter inch spacer between the block and bell housing then the adapter plate from bell housing to torque tube?

Thank you

If you bought a stock bell housing, then you have to have it machined for the torque tube adapter, which causes the need for the 1/4" spacer.
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Post  Raymond-P Wed Sep 15, 2021 12:42 pm

Happy to help.
First though, Please confirm that you have a C5 manual transmission bell housing. Your post says “C5 auto” and if you mean “automatic” there may be differences I’m unaware of.

Ray
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Post  Hotrodz of Dallas Wed Sep 15, 2021 2:06 pm

Raymond-P wrote:Happy to help.
First though, Please confirm that you have a C5 manual transmission bell housing.  Your post says “C5 auto” and if you mean “automatic” there may be differences I’m unaware of.

Ray

The C5 manual BH is no longer available. TPC is now using the auto BH and it requires the spacer and machining.
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Post  Raymond-P Wed Sep 15, 2021 3:02 pm

Bob nailed it! Also take a look at this post for more information:
Tue Oct 20, 2020 2:16 pm
by Admin

Ray
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Ray's 1987 944 LS1 Build & Swap - Page 6 Empty Thank you

Post  nphd2000 Wed Sep 15, 2021 5:30 pm

Thanks for the info. Reading so much of this stuff my head is spinning. I thought there was a new torque tube to bell housing adapter that eliminated the spacer between the C5 auto 1 piece bell housing and block, It seems I was mistaken. Kent sells both adapters/spacers I assume. I'll check that out when I'm ready for those parts...or near ready.
Thanks again....Sure I'll be asking more questions and I'll try to post in appropriate areas...this seemed to be the only active thread.

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Post  Raymond-P Wed Sep 15, 2021 6:41 pm

Lots of folks actively peruse the forum... and many are professional car builders that have their own fab shops.  These guys have some MAD SKILLS!!

I'm just one guy that's taking a bit longer to complete my build than the others which makes it look like I'm "active."  This is a hobby for me and I've been at it since 2014!

When you have a question, be sure to use the Advanced Search function as described by the ADMIN to zero in on what you need.   Be specific with key words, use the "Search for All Terms" button and Display results as "posts" vs topics to narrow things down.  Be sure you've selected applicable forums to search.  Sometimes what you're looking for could be in a different sub-forum.  

If you still come up short, don't hesitate to post a question.  I can almost guarantee you'll get responses within 24 hours.  Smile

One more thing.... Go ahead and start your own build thread with a catchy Thread Title where you can post questions and share your progress. Each of your posts can have a unique Post Title under your Thread Title as long as you add to it by using the REPLY button. It also makes it easy for forum users to respond.

Ray


Last edited by Raymond-P on Wed Sep 15, 2021 6:48 pm; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : added text)
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